Irish Songs Lyrics With Guitar Chords By Martin Dardis

Rambling Irishman Lyrics And Chords

Home
Lyrics + Chords A-B
C - F
G - J
K - M
N - R
S - T
U - Z
The Tin Whistle Song Book With Letter Notes
Sheet Music And Tin Whistle
Tin Whistle Music 2
Learning Tin Whistle
Children's Songs On Tin Whistle
Pop Songs For The Tin Whistle
Christmas Carols For The Tin Whistle
Traditional Whistle Sheet Music
The Dubliners
Christy Moore
Wolfe Tones
Fureys Brothers
Clancy Brothers And Tommy Makem
Pogues
Most Popular Songs
Dublin City Ramblers
Johnny McEvoy
Scottish Songs
Gaeilge Songs
Foster & Allen
Irish Brigade
Country And Pop
Mary Black
Derek Ryan
Eric Bogle
Corries
McCalmans
Saw Doctors
Seamus Moore
Tommy Sands
Colum Sands
Football And Hurling Songs
American Folk And Patriotic Songs
German Songs
Runrig
Charlie And The Bhoys
Big Tom
Nathan Carter Lyrics
Welsh Songs
Other Songs And Resources
Updates
Guestbook
Learn Guitar
Rambling Irishman Guitar Chords And Song Lyrics. Recorded by  Cathal McConnell And The Boys Of The Lough, The Wolfe Tones from the album ''Across The Broad Atlantic'', De Danann with Dolores Keane, The Oyster Band, The Starlight Singers. A traditional Irish song.

I[G]am a rambling[C] Irish[G]man
In Ulster [C]I was [G]born [D]in
And [G]many's the pleasant [C]day I [G]spent
Round the shores of [C]sweet Lough[D] Er[G]in
[G]For to be [C]poor I could[G] not endu[D]re
Like [G]others [C]of my [D]stati[G]on
To A[C]mericae I [D]sailed a[D]way
And [Em]]left this Irish [C]nati[D]on


Rye[G] tan tin a na,[C] tan tin a [G]na
Rye [G]tan tin a [C]nore in a[G] nan[D]dy
Rye[G] tan tin a na,[C] tan tin a [G]na
Rye tan tin a [C]nore in a [D]nan[G]dy


The night before I went away
I spent it with my darling
Three o'clock in the afternoon
'Til the break of day next morning
But when that we were going to part
We linked in each others arms
For Americae we soon set sail
A journey without no charms


Rye tan tin a na, tan tin a na
Rye tan tin a nore in a nandy
Rye tan tin a na, tan tin a na
Rye tan tin a nore in a nandy


And when we reached the other side
we were both stout and healthy
We dropped our anchor in the bay
Going down to Philadelphi
So let every lass drink to her lad
In blue jacket and white trousers
And let every lad drink to his lass
And take them as lifes spouses


Rye tan tin a na, tan tin a na
Rye tan tin a nore in a nandy
Rye tan tin a na, tan tin a na
Rye tan tin a nore in a nandy

whatever country the Irish people went to over the years
they took with them their music and songs. They took with
them too the stories and folk-tales which had been handed
down to them from generation to generation.
Our emigrants however, ` were not just content with the
songs and stories they took with them to other lands;
for these in the main told of events and happenings
in their own land. As far as our emigrants were concerned
different climes influenced them in producing different
stories and different rhymes. ` These new folk songs were
born out of their experiences in such far-flung lands as
Australia, America and Canada.
 
 
Those of our people who
came to Britain penned their own folk songs most of which
have survived unlike many of the American-Irish ballads which
died with the people who had written them.
Of course it was in the main the manual workers who played
their part in writing new folk songs and arousing interest in them.
The canals and railroads were instrumental in producing new
folk songs born of the Irish people abroad

rsz_1rsz_1rsz_greenwhiteorange2.jpg

Privacy Policy        Links  Copyright  2002 - 2014 Martin Dardis

rsz_1rsz_1rsz_greenwhiteorange2.jpg